Tripp Fenderson

incessantly curious

21-March, 2016
by Tripp
Comments Off on Basic bread recipe

Basic bread recipe

Hey Marcey! I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any questions.

Ingredients:

  • 725g (3 cups) warm water
  • 907g (6 1/2 to 7 1/2 cups of bread flour
  • 20g (1 Tbsp) Kosher salt
  • 17g (1 1/2 tbsp) SAF yeast
  • 15g vital wheat gluten w/ ascorbic acid (optional, used as a yeast nutrient)

Method:

Mix all dry ingredients, then add water. Stir until dough begins to form. Mix with hand until a rough ball is formed in the bowl. Turn dough out onto counter and begin kneading.

This is a high hydration dough, about 80% (link to a great online hydration calculator), so it’s going to be very wet and sticky! Because of that, I find it best to use the traditional French method for developing the gluten.

Here’s a few technique videos. I don’t love either as “perfect” examples but you should be able to get the idea.

In this one, he’s way more aggressive and seems to focus more on slapping than stretching: https://youtu.be/PvdtUR-XTG0

This one is ok too. She definitely puts more emphasis on stretching to develop the gluten strands, which is the goal: https://youtu.be/WVPD-lz_K7g

Knead for about 15 minutes or until it develops a supple feel and a good skin forms on your fold. You’ll get the feel of it the more times you do it.

Place dough in a dough bucket (or a mixing bowl) and cover lightly with plastic wrap. Let rise on the counter for about 1 hour.

After 1 hour, place dough in refrigerator and let sit overnight or up to 7 days. A cold ferment helps bring out the flavor in the dough so don’t neglect this step.

When you’re ready to bake, take the dough out and begin heating your oven to 450F. I use a ceramic pizza stone in my oven. If you have one, heat that as well. I also have a cast iron pan in the bottom of my oven that I use to steam the bread. If you’re doing this, make sure you heat your pan with the oven.

Weigh out 775g of dough. If you plop this amount of dough on the counter, it’s close to the size of a personal pan pizza from Pizza Hut. I weigh everything but there’s no right size — do what works for you.

Shape the dough into a boule (and put it into a brotform/banneton if you have one).

Video examples:
https://youtu.be/TtCu9hYGhOU
https://youtu.be/FcOaaooyNf8

Let the dough rise for about 1 hour. Turn dough out onto parchment or your peel, generously dusted in cornmeal, flour, or (what I use) Cream of Wheat.

Slice dough 2-4 times with 1/2” slits to allow steam to escape while baking and make fancy patterns in the bread.

Slide dough into oven and add approximately one cup of water to pan at bottom to generate steam. Close oven quickly to seal in moisture.

Bake for 35-40 minutes or until it’s a deep golden brown. Push the time as needed to let that color develop.

Remove from oven, listen to the delightful cracking of the crust and enjoy the smell. Do NOT cut open for at least an hour. Ideally you want to let it cool completely.

I hope that helps. Let me know if you have any questions. I absolutely love baking breads and I’m happy to help in any way I can.

Now go be as happy as Vincent Talleu in your kitchen!

10-August, 2015
by Tripp
Comments Off on Soft Pretzels

Soft Pretzels

 

Ingredients

  • 354g warm water
  • 16g sugar
  • 10g Kosher salt
  • 10g yeast (I recommend SAF brand)
  • 623g AP flour
  • 57g unsalted butter, melted
  • Vegetable oil, for bowl
  • 8 cups water
  • 1 Tbsp Lye (baking soda is an OK substitute in a pinch)
  • 1 large egg yolk beaten with 1 tablespoon water
  • Kosher or Pretzel Salt

Directions

Combine water, sugar and salt in a stand mixer. Add yeast and let rest for approximately 5 minutes (or until yeast begins to proof).

Add flour and butter and, using the dough hook attachment, mix on low speed until well combined. Change to medium speed and knead until the dough is smooth and pulls away from the side of the bowl, approximately 4 to 5 minutes. Add *small* amounts of flour or water to get the correct consistency. This will vary with the relative humidity in your kitchen.

Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let it proof for 45m to 1 hour, depending on the temp. When your dough has doubled in size, you can move on to the next step.

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Line 2 pans with parchment paper.

Pour 8 cups of water into a wide/shallow container. Tupperware is ok but a large stainless steel frying or sautee pan is best.

**CAUTION** LYE IS DANGEROUS!

Carefully mix lye (or baking soda) into the water (gloves and goggles are recommended).

Turn the dough out onto a slightly oiled work surface (I spray the counter with Pam or a similar product) and divide into 8-10 equal pieces. Roll out each piece of dough into a 24-inch rope. Make a U-shape with the rope, holding the ends of the rope, cross them over each other twice and press onto the bottom of the U in order to form the shape of a pretzel. Place onto the parchment-lined half sheet pan.

Place entire baking sheet in freezer for 5-8 minutes in order to make it easier to handle the lye dip.

NOTE: You can also stop at this point if you’re going to freeze the dough. Once each pretzel is frozen individually so that it won’t stick to others, simply bag up the pretzels and pull them out as needed.

After chilling the pretzels, place them gently into the lye solution for about 30 seconds, making sure the entire pretzel is submerged and washed in lye. Remove from the solution and place them on the parchment lined pan. Brush each with a small amount of the egg yolk mixture and sprinkle with pretzel or Kosher salt.

Bake until dark golden brown in color, approximately 12 to 15 minutes. Transfer to cooling rack for 5 minutes before serving.

NOTE: If using lye, you may notice a slight green discoloration on the bottom of some pretzels. This is a result of some chlorine coming out of your tap water and staining the egg. It’s all good. No worries. If your friends and family are freaked out about the color, that just means more pretzels for you.

Soft Pretzel

22-January, 2015
by Tripp
Comments Off on Mill Creek

Mill Creek

I spent a wonderful morning at the now-defunct golf course, The Colonial, just outside of Williamsburg, VA. I had permission from the owner and the county sheriff, who regularly monitors the property for trespassing — so don’t get any ideas.

The property fronts Mill Creek, a tributary of the Chickahominy River and with no signs of golfers for years, the area is absolutely teeming with wildlife.

Arrow marks the spot for my day camp along Mill Creek. NOTE: I had permission from the property owner to be on site. This area is regularly patrolled by both on and off-duty police.

Arrow marks the spot for my day camp along Mill Creek. NOTE: I had permission from the property owner to be on site. This area is regularly patrolled by both on and off-duty police.

Not so green

The greens are not so green anymore.

Cat tails make great tinder for fire.

Cat tails make great tinder for fire.

Someone has been busy as a....

Someone has been busy as a….

Beautiful morning along Mill Creek. Perfect spot for a day camp.

Beautiful morning along Mill Creek. Perfect spot for a day camp.

Getting ready for the rain.

Getting ready for the rain.

Prepping firewood with my folding Corona. It cuts wood like butter.

Prepping firewood with my folding Corona. It cuts wood like butter.

Prepped and ready. Let's make fire!

Prepped and ready. Let’s make fire!

Tinder bundle of yucca, cat tails, and pampas grass with my fire steel.

Tinder bundle of yucca, cat tails, and pampas grass with my fire steel.

Burn, baby. Burn!

Burn, baby. Burn!

The long dark tea time of the soul.

The long dark tea time of the soul.

Exploring the course. I wasn't sure that this rickety old cart path would hold my weight.

Exploring the course. I wasn’t sure that this rickety old cart path would hold my weight.

Yep. That's poop.

Yep. That’s poop.

Phyllotopsis nidulans growing on some standing white pine deadwood.

Phyllotopsis nidulans growing on some standing white pine deadwood.

Deer skull

Deer skull

13-September, 2013
by Tripp
Comments Off on RVA IPA

RVA IPA

A big thank you to Hardywood for hosting tonight’s dinner for the local hops growers who contributed to this year’s RVA IPA.

I prefer porters over IPAs but this is fantastic! I love the sweet, caramel finish.

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17-August, 2013
by Tripp
Comments Off on Hops Harvest – Year 1

Hops Harvest – Year 1

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Harvest day for my Centennial hops that I’m growing as a part of Hardywood Brewery’s Community Hopping Project.

In the spring of 2012, Hardywood gave out 1000 rhizomes to local gardeners interested in growing hops and contributing to a commercially brewed beer. The freshly picked local hops will serve as 100% of the hop bill of Hardywood’s RVA IPA.

I pulled 2.1 ounces and left the bines up for now to allow the plants to store up for the winter. It’s not much, but since many first year bines don’t flower at all, I’m excited to be able to contribute something.

I’ll turn them in to Hardywood today as well as meet up for a talk with head brewer Brian Nelson to learn more about bine management.

20-July, 2013
by Tripp
Comments Off on Summer harvest

Summer harvest

We’re at the peak of our summer harvest time. This morning’s haul included two varieties of zucchini, poblano, Serrano, jalapeño, and bell peppers, cucumber, and tomato.

I’ve been making and canning pizza sauce but a good portion of today’s harvest will go into several jars of pickled peppers and chutney.

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18-May, 2013
by Tripp
Comments Off on Practice, practice, practice

Practice, practice, practice

I’ve had the opportunity to spend a fair amount of time at the range recently. It’s good “in the moment” time and getting to know both my sidearm and a range of carbines has been enjoyable, especially Beretta’s CX4, which is used by several police departments across the US, including The College of William and Mary Campus Police Department.

That said, I have a problem that’s common for many new pistol shooters – low left. I’ve read countless forum posts from people blaming their weapon, the sights, or even the weather instead of the real problem — the shooter.

17-May, 2013, 15 yards, Beretta 9mm PX4 Sub-Compact

17-May, 2013, 15 yards, Beretta 9mm PX4 Sub-Compact

I view every visit to the range as an opportunity to improve and so setting goals for a particular session based on previous performance is important, otherwise, I’m just sending lead down range. My short-term goal is to master the 15-yard line with my pistol but I have some fundamental issues to address before I get there.

Specifically, I have a tendency to make a fist while firing instead of simply squeezing the trigger. By doing so, the pinky on my right hand is pulling the muzzle down and to the left as I fire, resulting in the low left shots seen in the target. With a little practice, this should be easily correctable.